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Post: Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, Story 4: La Morte Fiancée

The fourth story, ‘La Morte Fiancée’ / ‘The Death-Bride,’ opens the second volumes of Gespensterbuch and Fantasmagoriana. Along with ‘Les Portraits du Famille’ / ‘The Family Portraits,’ Mary Shelley recalls the reading of ‘La Morte … Continue reading

Post: Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, Story 3: La Tête de mort

The third story in Fantasmagoriana is a personal favourite. While the influence of ‘La Tête de Mort’ on Shelley’s Frankenstein is minimal at best, there are several intertextual tidbits related to this story that are … Continue reading

Post: The Rise and Fall of the Silver Fork Novel

Erin Johnson is in the fourth year of her DPhil in English at the University of Oxford. Her thesis examines representations of masculinity in the Brontës’ early writing and mature work. She’s also submitting BELLADONNA, a … Continue reading

Post: Teaching Romanticism XI: Percy Bysshe Shelley

by Daniel Cook As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I … Continue reading

Post: Victorian Legacies: Robin Hood: A Romantic Hero [Part II]

In this two-part post, Stephen Basdeo analyses the evolving Romantic and Victorian legacy of the most famous heroic outlaw found in English folklore, Robin Hood.Robin Hood: A Romantic Hero The Legacy of Ivanhoe (1820) In a previous … Continue reading

Post: Victorian Legacies: Robin Hood: A Romantic Hero [Part I]

In this two-part post, Stephen Basdeo analyses the evolving Romantic and Victorian legacy of the most famous heroic outlaw found in English folklore, Robin Hood. In 1795 Joseph Ritson (1752-1803) published Robin Hood: A Collection … Continue reading

Post: Victorian Legacies: The French Revolution’s Reign of Gothic Terror

There are quarrels in which even Satan, bringing help, were not unwelcome; even Satan, fighting stiffly, might cover himself with glory,—of a temporary sort.—Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History (1837), p. 87 The French Revolution … Continue reading

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